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Fashion Forward

Jesus Mancera

Reusing stuff that is already around is something that we should be doing, but we’re not…

As the adage goes, one man’s trash is another’s man treasure.

For Jesus Mancera, those plastic bottles discarded into trash bins aren’t just treasure — they’re fashion.

Mancera (’17, management and human resources) is the founder of Piruli Designs, a streetwear company that takes recycled plastic and transforms it into T-shirts and sweatshirts. Mancera’s desire to make clothing out of plastic was born during competitions sponsored by Cal Poly Pomona’s Student Innovation Idea Lab (iLab).

“Reusing stuff that is already around is something that we should be doing, but we’re not,” he says. “We can give consumers and end users an actual product that they can wear every day and share with other people the story of it.”

Mancera planned to pursue engineering at Cal Poly Pomona, but after struggling with high-level calculus, the 25-year-old switched to business. He knew he wanted to start his own business after taking a class on entrepreneurship from former Assistant Professor Nelson Pizarro.

In 2016, Mancera applied for the iLab’s Startup Challenge. His team designed a windshield wiper for motorcycle helmets that was attached to a glove, but Mancera soon learned that an established company already had a similar product on the market.

“It’s about who does it better, not who does it first,” Mancera remembers Pizarro’s telling him.

His six-student team didn’t get picked for the 2016 challenge, but he vowed to return. The next year, he put together a group of students he met at a club event. Calling themselves Plastic Crafted, the team proposed making sunglasses out of recycled plastic. They didn’t win the Startup Challenge, but did win another campus competition in 2017 hosted by the Office of Undergraduate Research.

That initial success inspired Mancera. After learning how costly it is to make eyeglasses out of plastic, he turned his attention to manufacturing T-shirts from the recycled material.

In the summer of 2017, he and two others teamed up, launched Piruli Design and entered a Pasadena Angels investors workshop contest to pitch their idea for plastic T-shirts . The trio finished second.

Today, co-founders Mancera and Nick DeOrian, a Cal State Fullerton graphic design alumnus, continue to push the clothing line.

“He works at a very fast pace,” DeOrian says of Mancera. “Every day, when I think we’re done working, he is ready for the next step. He’s all in. We’re both in it to win it. He cares just as much as I do.”

Sewing Goodwill and Success

In a small garage at the townhouse-style apartment complex where Mancera lives with his family in Westminster, he and DeOrian have managed to squeeze in some shelving and a computer workstation amid the bikes suspended from hooks and the boxes of personal items. It’s where the pair fulfills orders and prepares them for shipping, packing T-shirts into brown-paper cylinders emblazoned with the company’s logo. Mancera often delivers the packages to the nearby post office on his bike.

Meanwhile, in factories in Haiti and Guatemala, workers sew T-shirts and sweatshirts using fabric and thread that’s made from grounded-down recycled plastic. It takes around eight 16- and 24-ounce bottles to make one shirt. The imprinting is done in California, but most of the stitching takes place in these countries left decimated when athletic apparel giants like Nike and Adidas pulled out in search of cheaper labor and left behind abandoned factories, he says.

Making the clothing in Haiti and Guatemala gives companies like Piruli Designs an opportunity to help provide the people with a living wage, Mancera adds.

His company benefits from the workers’ expertise.

“We figured these people have generations of experience in making clothing,” he says. “Give them a new way. It doesn’t matter what kind of thread you give them. They are still going to be able to stitch.”

On weekends, Mancera and DeOrian hit up trade shows and other events where they can speak to clothing buyers and show them their gear. The reaction is something Mancera really enjoys.

“People say, ‘Oh wow, these are really soft,’ and I tell them the story behind it,” he says. “We always love saying they are 100 percent plastic and they ask, ‘What? Can I feel it?’”

Besides online and event sales, Piruli Designs is selling its shirts at the Bronco Bookstore at Cal Poly Pomona.

Brian Alexander-Fetterman, the Bronco Bookstore assistant general manager, says that students in the Apparel Merchandising and Management program have had their clothing line AM Squared in the store for several years, but this marks a first for a product coming out of the iLab.

Published on September 26, 2019

Impact Map

Explore Impact Map

The Impact Map shows how Cal Poly Pomona alumni are making a difference in Southern California and around the country. Explore the map or share your own impact.

Explore the map

Submit Your Story